Business Communication

Overview

Business communication encompasses topics such as marketing, brand management, customer relations, consumer behavior, advertising, public relations, corporate communication, community engagement, reputation management, interpersonal communication, employee engagement, and event management. It is closely related to the fields of professional communication and technical communication.

Business communication involves constant flow of information. Feedback is integral part of business communication. Organizations these days are verly large and involve large number of people. There are various levels of hierarchy in an organization. Greater the number of levels, the more difficult is the job of managing the organization. Communication here plays a very important role in process of directing and controlling the people in the oragnization. Immediate feedback can be obtained and misunderstandings if any can be avoided. There should be effective communication between superiors and subordinated in an organization, between organization and society at large (for example between management and trade unions). It is essential for success and growth of an organization. Communication gaps should not occur in any organization.

Business Communication is goal oriented. The rules, regulations and policies of a company have to be communicated to people within and outside the organization. Business Communication is regulated by certain rules and norms. In early times, business communication was limited to paper-work, telephone calls etc. But now with advent of technology, we have cell phones, video conferencing, emails, satellite communication to support business communication. Effective business communication helps in building goodwill of an organization.

Media channels for business communication:

Business communication focuses primarily on achieving goals/aims and, in the case of a public company or organization, increasing dividends of shareholders[2]

Business communication is a common topic included in the curricular of Undergraduate and Master's degree programs at many colleges and universities.
Categories of business communication

Marketing[3]
Brand Management[3]
Customer/public relations[3]

Methods of business communication

Web-based communication;
Video conferencing: allows people in different locations to hold interactive meetings;
Reports: important in documenting the activities of any department;
Presentations: popular method of communication in all types of organizations, usually involving audiovisual material, like copies of reports, or material prepared in Microsoft PowerPoint or Adobe Flash;
Telephone meetings: which allow for long distance speech;
Forum boards: which allow people to instantly post information at a centralized location;
Face-to-face meetings: which are personal and should have a written follow-up;
Suggestion box: primarily for upward communication, because some people may hesitate to communicate with management directly, so they can give suggestions by drafting one and putting it in the suggestion box.
Letters;[4]
Memos: letters to members of a company or organization;[4]

Directional business communication

Top-down communication
Communication within the business that is passed down from the top of the business hierarchy to the bottom, the amount of information passed from one level to another relies on a "need to know" basis.[5]
Bottom-up communication
Communication within the business that is passed up through the business hierarchy from the bottom up.[5]
Horizontal communication
Communication with those who are on the same level in the business hierarchy as one, very little information moves up or down the chain of command.[5]

Organizations

Founded in 1936 by Shankar is the Association for Business Communication (ABC),[6] originally called the Association of College Teachers of Business Writing, is "an international, interdisciplinary organization committed to advancing business communication research, education, and practice."
The IEEE Professional Communication Society (PCS) [1] is dedicated to understanding and promoting effective communication in engineering, scientific, and other environments, including business environments. PCS's academic journal,[7] is one of the premier journals in Europe communication. The journal’s readers are engineers, writers, information designers, managers, and others working as scholars, educators, and practitioners who share an interest in the effective communication of technical and business information.
The Society for Technical Communication is a professional association dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practice of technical communication. With membership of more than 6,000 technical communicators, it's the largest organization of its type in North America.
The International Business Communication Standards are practical proposals for the conceptual and visual design of comprehensible reports and presentations.

 

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